After years of dominating in the accessories market, Dakine has expanded into outerwear this season. The Zone Jacket sits in the middle of its jacket line, offering plenty of protection for the cold and deep without costing more than the average snowboard.

The Zone is a 2-layer shell built around DWR-coated nylon twill packing fully taped 15,000mm/10,000g waterproof/breathable protection. Outside of the rainiest, soggiest conditions, it will keep you dry and sheltered throughout any day of the winter, whether you’re lapping jumps or hiking to that undisturbed line just outside the orange string. A tricot-mesh-taffeta lining inside keeps moisture off your body to protect you from the rainstorm inside.

Dakine Zone Men's Snowboarding Jacket from behind
The rear of the Zone Jacket

It takes more than fabric to make a jacket, and the Dakine cuts and sews that fabric to give you all the function you need on the mountain. The attached drop hood and fold-over chin protector wrap your neck and head like a babushka, protecting it from wind and blowing snow. Hand gaiters and a zip-off powder skirt keep snow from slipping in, and the drop tail adds a little butt protection when sitting down to strap in. Once spring weather rolls around, you can stay cool but protected by unzipping the pits and letting the air in. The Zone has plenty of storage, including goggle and media pockets.

The Zone is available now for $299 in several two-color patterns. You’ve already been rocking the Dakine label for years on backpacks, gloves, hats, etc., why not let them protect your body?

  • Fabric Waterproof Rating: 15,000 mm
  • Fabric Breathability Rating: 10,000 g/m²
  • Hood:  fixed
  • Venting: mesh-lined underarm zips
  • Powder Skirt: yes, removable
  • Pockets: (external) 2 front zippered handwarmer, 1 chest zipper, 1 sleeve pass, (internal) media, goggle
  • Seams: fully taped

 

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Chris Weiss has been snowboarding, mountain biking and otherwise tempting death for nearly 20 years. After a few stints in go-nowhere mountain bum jobs, he asked himself, "Why not eek out a living doing something I love?" Since sports sponsors tend to ignore applications from late-20s dudes with mediocre skills and beer flab, Weiss jumped on the other side of the media fence to cover industry happenings. He now writes about sports innovations, technology, travel and automobiles for a number of leading Web properties.

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